Posts Tagged ‘Football Fans’

Soccer - Barclays Premier League - Newcastle United v Portsmouth - St James' Park

For years we have been told that the Premier League is the greatest league in the world by the marketing force of Sky, with the best fans to go along with it.

Nothing is quite the same as the group of fans who have had football thrust upon them since the day they were born, with generations of ‘bleeding’ the colours of their kit imprinted on their DNA in the same manner as an heart disease or hairline deficiency will one day catch up with them.

“There is no atmosphere in football like in England,” we are told. “Can (insert foreign player here) adapt to having a stadium of grown men tunelessly warble simple ditties, or insult referees? It’s not quite like home,” they tell us, as though tuneless ditties do not exist anywhere else in the world.

I, among many others have had experience of football in foreign pastures. The Nou Camp is a fairly quiet place, watched in an almost theatrical sense, with food being passed out around the ground during the action and any noise being a murmur that grows into a crescendo the closer the ball gets to the opposition’s goal.

Both Spain and Italy have this reputation for having a small contingent of ‘ultras’ who do the singing and chanting, while the rest of the crowd simply sit back and enjoy what unfolds before them.

Germany has recently garnered a reputation for having a lively in-match atmosphere to finally rival England, with their low ticket prices making the game easily accessible for people of all working classes to go and enjoy the experience.

Camp Nou

The Camp Nou is a different experience to watching football in England

For despite all the talk about how great English football is for atmosphere, the persistent inflation of ticket prices has in fact damaged it heavily, and there appears to be a real lack of identity to the fan-base within the grounds.

The working classes will now find it harder and harder to afford to make top flight games in particular and quite frankly we as a nation have become somewhat more placid of late, our interest mainly on being entertained by what we have paid through the nose to see, rather than be part of the show ourselves.

The worst part about the English football for what I have noticed however, is that we actually seem to revel more in the misery of others, rather enjoy our own victories and accomplishments. That tribal aspect of completing a hunt is diminishing by the day, as we instead taunt the carcass of our prey, instead of feasting on the flesh that was the goal in the first place.

Take Monday night’s fixture between Tottenham Hotspur and Aston Villa for example. Now as a Spurs fan, I can testify that White Hart Lane has definitely lost some of the atmosphere it became renowned for over the past few years.

This is most likely a consequence of Spurs becoming a better side and therefore being expected to win most of their matches on home soil, with it surely no coincidence that the best sounding atmospheres of last season were the home victories over Chelsea and Arsenal; two games which were far more intense and had no real guarantee of a win (if there ever is such a thing with Spurs?).

With an early goal helping settle a contest against the weakest side in the division currently, there was little for the travelling Villa fans to get their teeth into, or extract any hope, while any Spurs nerves were put to bed and they relaxed into what was now expected to be a comfortable victory.

Kane & Lamela

Kane & Lamela celebrate the final goal in Spurs’ victory over Villa on Monday

This in turn saw the noise levels among the home fans drop significantly early on. With now ample opportunity to inflict their own decibels into the night sky as the numbers game decreased, we should have expected a number of pro-Villa songs from the away end, urging their side to overcome the odds stacked against them and mount a comeback.

Instead, they took solace in the fact that they were the only ones singing, with the majority of their chants referencing the quiet around them. “Is this a library?” “We forgot that you were here.” That sort of tired rubbish. Instead of attempting to play a part (no matter how small) in a Villa comeback, they simply bragged that they were willing to make more noise than their counterparts, despite being greatly outnumbered.

Now this is no sleight at either Villa or Spurs, but an example of the norm these days. Home fans will largely only have a small pocket of fans who believe chanting is part of their matchday experience. Away fans will be expected to attempt to make a greater noise to mask their numerical disadvantage and will revel in doing so. Especially if their team is losing and they need to attain some form of one-upmanship.

This is by no means restricted to the money-orientated Premier League either, with little Bournemouth hardly adding much noise following their promotion. Last season I spent plenty of time down at Griffin Park watching Brentford and found little to differentiate between the strange atmospheres generated at the top.

Both sides would often claim to “sing on our own,” leading me to feel there must be some acoustical problems within the ground, as people from either end would often do this in tandem, again failing to bother singing about their own side and/or players.

Goals are rarely so much celebrated among the group, but met with rude hand gestures towards the opposition fans, goading them in their disappointment. The initial songs following a goal are not to triumph that success and will their side on further, but to revel in the misery of their counterparts, questioning, “who are ya?” reminding them that they are no longer signing, or informing them that they could potentially be relegated on the back of this potential result.

Vardy v Leicester

This Vardy strike appeared to provoke an angry reaction from one West Brom fan

Beyond simply singing mocking and/or offensive songs there is also the truth that outside of South America, Great Britain is the only place on earth you appear to see grown men careering down the turnstiles to ‘get at’ an opposition player who has just netted.

On Saturday, one such example arose as pictures just caught the image of a West Brom fan seeming to be being restrained by a steward, as Jamie Vardy celebrated near the crowd after scoring Leicester’s third goal in their victory over the Baggies.

It is something we see fairly consistently, and a fairly mild-mannered friend of mine has admitted to doing so at a Cambridge United match previously. Lord knows what would actually happen if they were allowed to get there; most likely they would baulk at the confrontation if it were allowed to happen. Fortunately this isn’t South America.

It just seems weird that we in England cling to this ‘best fans in the world’ idea of ourselves. It may well come from the fact that we are no longer a major force on the international scene and once again need to establish some form of dominance somewhere.

But the truth is we are not. We are bound somewhere in the purgatory that exists between pacifism and outright violence, seemingly unable to find any form of solace being between the two extremes.

For we as a people and as a fan-base are drawn purely to misery, more so than any accomplishments. And the only way we can find true happiness anymore is by finding people more miserable than us, in one way or another.

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